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Working paper

The Elasticity of Taxable Income in New Zealand (WP 12/03)

Issue date: 
Friday, 3 August 2012
Status: 
Current
View point: 
Document Date: 
Publication category: 
JEL classification: 
H24 - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies; includes inheritance and gift taxes
H31 - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents: Household
ISBN: 
978-0-478-39656-0

Formats and related files

This paper reports estimates of the elasticity of taxable income with respect to the net-of-tax rate for New Zealand taxpayers.

Abstract

This paper reports estimates of the elasticity of taxable income with respect to the net-of-tax rate for New Zealand taxpayers. The relative stability of the New Zealand personal income tax system, in terms of marginal rates, thresholds and the tax base, provides helpful conditions for deriving these estimates. The elasticity of taxable income was estimated to be substantially higher for the highest income groups. Generally it was higher for men than for women. Changes in the timing of income flows for the higher income recipients were found to be an important response to the announcement of a new higher-rate bracket. The marginal welfare costs of personal income taxation were consistent across years, being relatively small for all but the higher tax brackets. For the top marginal rate bracket of 39 per cent, the welfare cost of raising an extra dollar of tax revenue was estimated to be well in excess of a dollar. Furthermore, for the top bracket the marginal tax rate was often found to exceed the revenue-maximising tax rate.

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Acknowledgements

We should like to thank Steve Cantwell, James Browne, Raj Chetty and Mario Di Maio for helpful comments on an earlier draft.

Disclaimer

The views, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this Working Paper are strictly those of the author(s). They do not necessarily reflect the views of the New Zealand Treasury or the New Zealand Government. The New Zealand Treasury and the New Zealand Government take no responsibility for any errors or omissions in, or for the correctness of, the information contained in these working papers. The paper is presented not as policy, but with a view to inform and stimulate wider debate.

Last updated: 
Wednesday, 8 August 2012