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Working paper

Managing for Outcomes in the New Zealand Public Management System (WP 04/15)

Issue date: 
Tuesday, 1 June 2004
Status: 
Current
View point: 
Document Date: 
Publication category: 
JEL classification: 
D29 - Production and Organizations: Other
D73 - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
H19 - Structure and Scope of Government: Other

Formats and related files

This paper argues that if a results focus is to truly be introduced to the New Zealand public management system then all aspects of the wider system will need to be amended, in order to support a general cultural change.

Abstract

Managing for Outcomes is the process by which central agencies and Ministers are seeking to promote a results focus within the New Zealand public management system. This paper argues that if a results focus is to truly be introduced to the New Zealand public management system then all aspects of the wider system will need to be amended, in order to support a general cultural change. In promoting this view the paper provides a summary of the system as it currently stands and considers how the structural, financial, strategic and performance management elements of the wider public management system could be amended to support an outcomes focus within the core New Zealand public service.

Acknowledgements

This paper summarises a thesis prepared in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Masters of Public Management degree from Victoria University of Wellington.

In completing that thesis I need to acknowledge the support and assistance I received from my colleagues in the New Zealand Treasury. I also wish to thank Charles Brougham, Peter Hughes, Chris Martin, Alex Matheson, Brett Mudgway, Richard Mulgan, John Raine, Derek Russell, Geoff Sadler, Jonathan Slater and Judith Smith for willingly sharing their thoughts and experiences with me.

Thanks also to Bill Ryan, Graham Scott and Tom Berthold for their comments on the initial thesis.

Disclaimer

The views, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this Working Paper are strictly those of the author(s). They do not necessarily reflect the views of the New Zealand Treasury.  The Treasury takes no responsibility for any errors or omissions in, or for the correctness of, the information contained in these working papers. The paper is presented not as policy, but with a view to inform and stimulate wider debate.

Last updated: 
Tuesday, 23 October 2007